http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VAIBS

VAIBS

VAIBS, Victims Against Illegal Bank SURUGA (違法銀行スルガと闘う被害者の会 Ihō ginkō suruga to tatakau higaishia no kai, a Japanese name?), is an organization which is against racial profiling by Suruga Bank, [1] a bank in Japan.

VAIBS[2][3][4] sued Suruga Bank for racial profiling in February 2007. The case number is HEISEI 19(RE)467 in Tokyo District Court. Suruga Bank forced minorities into unnecessary documentation.[5] After the lawsuit, Suruga Bank suspended its discriminatory policies and practices.[6]

[edit] Discrimination in Japan

[edit] Ethnic Minorities in Japan

U.S. Department of State described ‘National/Racial/Ethnic Minorities’ in Japan,[7] Despite legal safeguards against discrimination, the country’s large populations of Korean, Chinese, Brazilian, and Filipino permanent residents–many of whom were born, raised, and educated in Japan–were subject to various forms of deeply entrenched societal discrimination, including restricted access to housing, education, and employment opportunities. There was a widespread perception among citizens that “foreigners,” often members of Japan‑born ethnic minorities, were responsible for most of the crimes committed in the country. The media fostered this perception although Ministry of Justice statistics showed that the “foreigner”‑committed crime rate, excepting crimes like illegal entry and overstay, was lower than the crime rate for citizens.

Banking Identification Act in Japan, which regulates a bank account registration, does not separate legal residents from Japanese citizens.[8] Despite this legal safeguard against discrimination, SURUGA Bank unequally treated minority residents–many of whom were born, raised, and educated in Japan. Minorities in Japan were subject to deeply entrenched societal discrimination, including restricted access to a bank account opportunity.

Furthermore, a lower court judge, Shogo Okazaki, wrote in the court ruling about a widespread perception among citizens that “foreigners,” often members of Japan‑born ethnic minorities, were responsible for most of the crimes committed in the country. On the contrary, Ministry of Justice statistics showed that the “foreigner”‑committed crime rate, excepting crimes like illegal entry and overstay, was lower than the crime rate for citizens.,[9]

[edit] Discrimination in bank

Suruga Bank acknowledges[10] ‘Unfortunately, many foreign residents may have had to contend with a negative image at some Japanese banks and not been granted home loans. More than a few have been disappointed at not being granted the desired loan.’

In February 2000, an American journalist Steven L. Herman filed a lawsuit against the Asahi Bank after it refused his application for a housing loan of Y68.5 million because he did not have permanent residence status.[11]

[edit] ‘Alien card’ lawsuit

Japan‑born ethnic minorities are legally called ‘alien’ by ‘Alien Registration Law’[12], a real Japan’s law, and must carry ‘an alien card’ anywhere anytime.[13]

Suruga Bank denied minorities a bank account if they do not present ‘an alien card.’ Even if minorities show a driver’s licence, Suruga Bank rejected a bank account.[14]

‘Alien Registration Law’[15] says, ‘The alien shall present his registration certificate to the Immigration Inspector, Immigration Control Officer (meaning the Immigration Control Officer provided for in the Immigration Control Act), Police Official, Maritime Safety Official or any other official of the state or local public entity prescribed by the Ministry of Justice Ordinance, if such official requests the presentation of the registration certificate in the performance of his duties.’ Suruga Bank is not an ‘Immigration Inspector’ or ‘Police Official.’

VAIBS sued Suruga Bank over its ‘Alien Card’ policies and practices. ‘Alien Card’ lawsuit against SURUGA Bank charges racial/ethnic/national discrimninatiton. The case number is HEISEI 19(RE)467 in Tokyo District Court. You can read the court paper in Tokyo District Court. The next court trial is set for September 2008.

[edit] See also

[edit] References

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: