Archive for August, 2008

Minorities forced into submission by SURUGA Bank

Posted in discrimination with tags , , , , on August 26, 2008 by vaibs

SURUGA Bank forced minorities into mandatory documentaion needlessly. SURUGA Bank’s practices were against Personal Information Protection Act. We filed a lawsuit. We are restoring minorities’ freedom.

SURUGA Bank’s discriminatory policy jeopardized privacy.

Posted in discrimination on August 20, 2008 by vaibs

We expressed outrage at SURUGA Bank’s discriminatory policy that jeopardized privacy of minorities. The policy forced minorities to submit unnecessary sensitive information against their will. It’s against the law. SURUGA Bank is an illegal bank.

We sued over SURUGA Bank’s illegal policy.

Posted in Uncategorized on August 16, 2008 by vaibs

We filed a landmark lawsuit one and a half year ago to stop SURUGA Bank from conducting surveillance under its discriminatory policy that gives SURUGA Bank virtually unchecked power to intercept minorities’s sensitive information. The case was filed on behalf of a broad coalition of minorities, race, ethnicity, and nationality whose privacy are greatly compromised by the policy.

segregation in Japan

Posted in Uncategorized on August 10, 2008 by vaibs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discrimination_lawsuits_and_incidents_in_Japan

Discrimination in Japan

[change] Minorities in Japan

U.S. Department of State described ‘National/Racial/Ethnic Minorities’ in Japan,[1] Despite legal safeguards against discrimination, the country’s large populations of Korean, Chinese, Brazilian, and Filipino permanent residents–many of whom were born, raised, and educated in Japan–were subject to various forms of deeply entrenched societal discrimination, including restricted access to housing, education, and employment opportunities. There was a widespread perception among citizens that “foreigners,” often members of Japan‑born ethnic minorities, were responsible for most of the crimes committed in the country. The media fostered this perception although Ministry of Justice statistics showed that the “foreigner”‑committed crime rate, excepting crimes like illegal entry and overstay, was lower than the crime rate for citizens.

Banking Identification Act in Japan, which regulates a bank account registration, does not separate minority legal residents from Japanese citizens.[2] Despite this legal safeguard against discrimination, Suruga Bank, a bank in Japan, unequally treated minority residents–many of whom were born, raised, and educated in Japan. Minorities in Japan were subject to deeply entrenched societal discrimination, including restricted access to a bank account opportunity.

Furthermore, a lower court judge, Shogo Okazaki, wrote in the court ruling about a widespread perception among citizens that “foreigners,” often members of Japan‑born ethnic minorities, were responsible for most of the crimes committed in the country. On the contrary, Ministry of Justice statistics showed that the “foreigner”‑committed crime rate, excepting crimes like illegal entry and overstay, was lower than the crime rate for citizens.,[3]

[change] Discrimination in Japanese banks

Suruga Bank acknowledges[4] “Unfortunately, many foreign residents may have had to contend with a negative image at some Japanese banks and not been granted home loans. More than a few have been disappointed at not being granted the desired loan.”

In February 2000, an American journalist Steven L. Herman filed a lawsuit against the Asahi Bank, a bank in Japan, after it refused his application for a housing loan of Y68.5 million because he was not a Japanese citizen.[5] Although Steven L. Herman was rich, married to a Japanese national and lived in Japan for years, Asahi Bank denied a loan only because he was not a Japanese citizen at that time.

[change] “Alien card” lawsuit

Japan‑born ethnic minorities are legally called “alien” by “Alien Registration Law”[6], a real Japan’s law, and must carry ‘an alien card’ anytime anywhere.[7]

Suruga Bank denied minorities a bank account if they do not present “an alien card.” Even if minorities show a driver’s licence, Suruga Bank rejected a bank account.[8]There was no reason for this. It was not a loan, jusut a bank account.

“Alien Registration Law”[9] says, “The alien shall present his registration certificate to the Immigration Inspector, Immigration Control Officer (meaning the Immigration Control Officer provided for in the Immigration Control Act), Police Official, Maritime Safety Official or any other official of the state or local public entity prescribed by the Ministry of Justice Ordinance, if such official requests the presentation of the registration certificate in the performance of his duties.” Suruga Bank is not an “Immigration Inspector” or “Police Official.”

VAIBS sued Suruga Bank over its ‘Alien Card’ policies and practices. “Alien Card” lawsuit against SURUGA Bank charges racial/ethnic/national discrimninatiton. The case number is HEISEI 19(RE)467 in Tokyo District Court. You can read the court paper in Tokyo District Court. The next court trial is set for September 2008.

[change] Segregation in bank

[change] VAIBS

VAIBS, Victims Against Illegal Bank SURUGA (違法銀行スルガと闘う被害者の会 Ihō ginkō suruga to tatakau higaishia no kai, a Japanese name?), is an organization which is against racial profiling by Suruga Bank, [10] a bank in Japan.

VAIBS[11][12][13] sued Suruga Bank for racial profiling in February 2007. The case number is HEISEI 19(RE)467 in Tokyo District Court. Suruga Bank forced minorities into unnecessary documentation.[14] After the lawsuit, Suruga Bank suspended its discriminatory policies and practices.[15]

[change] Racial segregation in SURUGA Bank

SURUGA Bank did not open a bank account because minorities did not show an “alien card” for ID, even if minorities submit a driver’s license. The discriminatory bank forced minorities into a minority-only ID requirement. There were separate ID requirements in SURUGA Bank. Although Banking Identification Act in Japan does not separate minorities from Japanese citizens, SURUGA Bank divided them for no reason. It was not until February 2007 that things began to change. An organization named VAIBS, Victims Against Illegal Bank SURUGA, began to rally for equal rights for minorities in Japan. VAIBS protested at the way they were treated. After VAIBS sued SURUGA Bank, the illegal bank suspended its dividing policy. VAIBS forced SURUGA Bank to integrate minorities and citizens in Japan, making SURUGA Bank the last bank to have minority-only ID requirement.

[change] Dark side of Japan

[change] Filipina

In 1994, Tokyo District Court ordered Japan’s Immigration Bureau to issue a visa to a Filipino woman who had Japanese kids from her marriage with a Japanese husband who had died. Japan’s Immigration Bureau reluctantly issued a one-year visa to her after losing the court case. However, the law was never revised, and this issue continued to be treated as a policy matter, which left the woman without any legal protection of her status in Japan.

Japan’s Immigration Bureau uses “policies” in handling most special cases rather than “law.” Japan’s Immigration Bureau prefers it this way because it can essentially do anything it wishes to with foreigners when a situation is not clearly stipulated in law.

[change] Arnold Schwarzenegger and an Iranian

On the contrary, former Justice Minister Shozaburo Nakamura allowed a famous American movie star, not yet Governor at that time, Arnold Schwarzenegger, to land in Japan without a passport but he never allowed an Iranian who was married to a Japanese national and had two children to do so. According to the media he allowed the former to land because his family was a fan of the star. This was too much, however, and Nakamura was forced to resign as Justice Minister in March 1999. Such actions are policies or in other words left to the capricious whims of Justice Ministry bureaucrats.

Japan’s Immigration Bureau likes policies because they are flexible and can be changed on a case-by-case basis as the bureau likes. The other reason why Japan’s Immigration Bureau does not want to change these policies into law is because laws are challengeable, but it is difficult to challenge policies.[16]

[change] Brazilian

In 1998, a Brazilian woman was refused to enter a jewelry shop in Japan because she was not a Japanese citizen. She filed a discrimination lawsuit. She said, “Actually, my case was just one of similar incidents that have occurred in this town. But I decided to take legal action because I thought somebody should stand up and let the public know that discrimination does exist in Japan.”[17][18] And she won.[19][20][21][22][23][24]

[change] Korean

In 2005, a Korean woman was refused to rent a room in Japan because she was not a Japanese citizen. She filed a discrimination lawsuit. And she won.[25]

[change] Discriminatory hot spring

The original problematic sign

Debito Arudou visited a hot spring in Japan, but the hot spring denied him. Although he had a Japanese citizenship, the hot spring rejected him because “his appearance was not Japanese-like.” In 2001, Debito Arudou filed a racial discrimination lawsuit against the hot spring and a city. And he won.[26]

[change] See also

[change] References

[change] External links

 

SURUGA Bank’s ID search of minorities for sensitive information

Posted in Uncategorized on August 3, 2008 by vaibs

We care about SURUGA Bank’s invasive search of minorities for unnecessary sensitive information. SURUGA Bank treated us like a suspect. SURUGA Bank’s unreasonable search was based on race, ethnicity, or nationality.